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Month: August 2022

5 Ways Google Sheets SDK Could be better. A Tutorial on How to Integrate with Google Sheets. (Startup Part 17)

Googlesheets (GS) is one of those data sources that I think most data scientists use and probably dread a little. Using GS is easy enough, but what if a client gives you data in GS? Or worse, what if they have a lot of data in GS and other data that isn’t? Personally, whenever I’ve encountered data in GS, I’ve usually just downloaded it as a CSV and worked on it from there. This works fine, but if you have to do something that requires you to pull this data programmatically? This is where it gets a lot harder. This article will serve as both a rant and tutorial for anyone who is seeking to integrate GoogleSheets into their products.

I decided that it would be worthwhile to write a connector (plugin) for Apache Drill to enable Drill to read and write Google Sheets. After all, after Excel, they are probably one of the most common ways people store tabular data. We’ve really wanted to integrate GoogleSheets into DataDistillr as well, so this seemed like a worthy project. You can see this in action here:

So where to start?

Aha! You say… Google provides an API to access GS documents! So what’s the problem? The problem is that Google has designed what is quite possibly one of the worst SDKs I have ever seen. It is a real tour de force of terrible design, poor documentation, inconsistent naming conventions, and general WTF.

To say that this was an SDK designed by a committee is giving too much credit to committees. It’s more like a committee who spoke one language, hired a second committee which spoke another language to retain development teams which would never speak with each other to build out the API in fragments.

As you’ll see in a minute, the design decisions are horrible, but this goes far beyond bad design. The documentation, when it exists, is often sparse, incomplete, incoherent or just plain wrong. This really could be used as an exemplar of how not to design SDKs. I remarked to my colleague James who did the code review on the Drill side, that you can tell when I developed the various Drill components as the comments get snarkier and snarkier.

Let’s begin on this tour of awfulness.

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What’s in a name? How to Split and Enrich People’s Names. (So I launched a Startup, Pt: 16)

One of the biggest challenges in data science and analytics is… well… the data. I did a podcast and the interviewer (Lee Ngo) asked me a question about challenges in data science. We were talking and I told him that it reminded me a lot of a story I heard about immigrants to America in the early 20th century. They came here thinking the streets were paved with gold, but when they arrived, they discovered that not only were the streets not paved with gold, they were not paved at all, and they were expected to pave them. What does this have to do with data?

Well, it always surprises me when new data scientists or data analysts are surprised when they start a project and the data is rubbish. Especially when organizations are early in their data journey, it is very common to have data that is extremely difficult to work with. When this happens, you can either complain about it, as many data scientists are wont to do, or you can roll up your sleeves and start cleaning.

With that said, one of the things that always surprises me is how little data cleaning is often offered in most data tools, which in turn has spawned an entire industry of data cleaning or data quality tools which need to be bolted into your data stack. I’ve always felt this was silly and that this is a basic functionality that analytic tools should just have. So DataDistillr does! But I digress, let’s get back to the original topic of cleaning names.

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